GAA Healthy Clubs Project – The Hague/Den Haag

HEALTHY CLUB PROJECT HCP

 

How can your club get involved in the GAA’s Healthy Club Project? GAA Community & Health Manager Colin Regan discusses the GAA’s Community & Health Departments flagship project, the Healthy Club Project, and outlines the future plans for this innovative and exciting work – talk taken from the 2015 GAA Health & Wellbeing Conference.

GAA #LITTLETHINGS CAMPAIGN

The GAA and the HSE are working in partnership to bring the messages of protection, resilience and support for mental wellness to local communities.

The #littlethings campaign highlights that we all experience difficult times in our lives, and that when we do, there are some evidence-based little things that can make a big difference to how we feel. For more information go to http://www.yourmentalhealth.ie

Campaign ambassador, Galway’s Gary Sice, talks about the little things he does to improve his game. What little things do you do?

Remember to reach out to Den Haag Healthy Clubs Officers if you need support as an expatriate in The Netherlands, we are here to help.

 

 

Another Campaign Ambassador, Cork’s Ashling Thompson, talks about the little things she does to improve her game.

Do contact Den Haag Healthy Clubs Project Team if you are facing difficulties as an expatriate. 

 

The Healthy Club project aims to help GAA clubs explore how they support the holistic health of their members and the communities they serve. GAA clubs already contribute to the health and wellbeing of their members by providing opportunities to develop their physical, social, emotional, and psychological health.

The project aims to help GAA clubs identify what they are already doing well, identify areas where they can or would like to improve, and empower them to ensure that everyone who engages with their club benefits from the experience in a health-enhancing way, be they players, officers, coaches, parents, supporters, or members of their local community.

The healthy club model, which is based on best national and international practice, also aims to embed a healthy philosophy in a club while integrating health into the day-to-day club activities in a sustainable way. It also aims to place the local GAA club at the heart of the community, making it a beacon for health in the locale.

GAA Healthy Club Project

 

A HEALTHY CLUB IS A HAPPY CLUB

Friday 12 October 2018


By Colin Regan, GAA Community & Health manager

Living in student squalor in 1994 in the upstairs of a Georgian building on Richmond Street, Dublin 2, we band of seven brothers decided something was required to fire up our maternal side.

We certainly weren’t mothering ourselves. At times our two-bedroom hovel resembled the decrepit flat called home by Withnail and I in Bruce Robinson’s eponymous cult movie classic. While we never resorted to smothering ourselves with deep heat to fend off the cold, we did at times run the risk of creating new life in the kitchen sink as aging food particles and strange organisms intermingled. The thoughts.

Goldfish were decided upon to give our lives meaning and purpose. The pet shop next door, long since gone, was reminiscent of the establishment in which mogwai was bought; he of Gremlins notoriety. Two fine specimens were selected after very little deliberation. The words of the old shop owner as we departed his store have stayed with me ever since. ‘A hungry fish is a happy fish, and a happy fish is a healthy fish,’ he sagely offered.

Neptune died within days. Not from over-feeding I can assure you. But Lucile lived happily (hungrily anyway) for many years.

The phrase returned to me last Thursday night as I laughed loudly as James Patrice stole the show at the St. Sylvester’s GAA Healthy Club launch. I’m often asked to describe in a sentence what the Healthy Club project is all about. I usually try to draw on my previous life as a journalist to come up with a fancy definition that ticks all the boxes about sport, and health, and life, and community, and wellbeing. Then it came to me. A healthy club is a happy club and a happy club is a healthy club. The hungry bit is superfluous. Nobody likes a hangry club.

GAA link to full article: A Healthy Club is a Happy Club

 

Emergency Support The Netherlands

Helpline – Healthy Club Officer

Den Haag GAA

 

Video re First Aid Training:

First Aid Video

 

 

HEALTHY CLUBS PROJECT 

 

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Den Haag GAA Club
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Holland Ladies

Healthy Club Project

The Healthy Club project aims to help GAA clubs explore how they support the holistic health of their members and the communities they serve. GAA clubs already contribute to the health and wellbeing of their members by providing opportunities to develop their physical, social, emotional, and psychological health.

The project aims to help GAA clubs identify what they are already doing well, identify areas where they can or would like to improve, and empower them to ensure that everyone who engages with their club benefits from the experience in a health-enhancing way, be they players, officers, coaches, parents, supporters, or members of their local community.

The healthy club model, which is based on best national and international practice, also aims to embed a healthy philosophy in a club while integrating health into the day-to-day club activities in a sustainable way. It also aims to place the local GAA club at the heart of the community, making it a beacon for health in the locale.

 

Link to GAA Healthy Clubs Project

 

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Get Involved in Healthy Clubs

What is the Healthy Club project (HCP)?

Background

The HCP is a GAA initiative backed by Irish Life and Healthy Ireland. It is focused on improving the health of the nation. The GAA, which reaches into every community on the island of Ireland, has always had a significant role to play in the health of the nation through its promotion of Gaelic Games. The association’s HCP brings a new dimension to this work and capitalises on the key role played by GAA clubs in local communities. The project empowers clubs to deliver health and wellbeing information and programmes directly to their members and to the wider communities that they serve.

Aim

The aim is to ensure that everyone who engages with their GAA club benefits from the experience in a health-enhancing way, be they players, officers, coaches, parents, supporters, or members of their local community.

The intention is that GAA clubs will become hubs for health information and programmes thereby empowering their members and communities to enjoy healthier lifestyles.

The ultimate aim of the project is to involve every GAA club in the country, thus enhancing the long term health of every community in the 32 counties and ensuring a healthier future for everyone.

Benefits and Opportunities for Clubs

Clubs who completed the pilot phases have been awarded and recognised as official “Healthy Clubs” which is completely ground breaking and the first of its kind in Ireland. Waterford IT’s Centre for Health Behavioural Research has endorsed the project’s positive impact on the health orientation and practice of participating clubs.

The following benefits and opportunities provides an evident based rationale on why clubs should get involved:

  • Exclusive access to Healthy Club resources
  • Increase in membership
  • Improvements in the health promoting activities of clubs specifically with club policy, practice and the club environment (both physical and cultural).
  • Opportunity to share learnings and experience with other like – minded clubs
  • Changes in attitudes towards health for the better
  • Better engagement with club activities
  • Opening up funding avenues
  • Better opportunity to link the local community with club activities
  • Sense of achievement
  • Set a positive example
  • Networking opportunities
  • Increase in media coverage both locally and nationally
  • Part of a grounding breaking project, first of its kind in Europe.
  • Recognition by the GAA and the Health Service Executive (approved by Healthy Ireland)

Challenges

As with all new projects, the HCP is not without its challenges. Some of the challenges experienced by clubs included:

  • Club capacity: some clubs found it difficult to recruit personnel for their project teams and at times a lot of work fell onto the shoulders of just one person. The clubs that excelled had an active project team and support from the Club Executive.
  • Resistance: some clubs referred to the “old school mentality” within their clubs which made the project at times a “hard sell”. However, the “small steps” message resonated with clubs and they kept “chipping away” and innovating around how to position this new type of activity within a traditional organisation.
  • Buy in from the club executive committee: some clubs found that without the backing of their club executive committee, it was difficult to carry out some Healthy Club activities.
  • Documentation: some clubs, particularly those with limited team members found the documentation element on the portal a challenge. The process and reporting element has since been refined and simplified to make it as user friendly as possible for volunteers. It is also necessary that some members of the Healthy Club team is familiar with computers to document the clubs progress as the accreditation process is done via the online portal.

Even though clubs met and overcame challenges along the way the positive impact the HCP had on fully committed clubs was ground breaking.

Timeline

The HCP was created in 2013 and has grown from the genesis of an idea for a small pilot into a programme heralded as an exemplar of the Healthy Ireland framework in action. It has also been recognised at European level as offering an exemplar framework for how to utilise the sports clubs setting for the delivery of health promotion (Sports Club for Health, 2016 https://www.scforh.info/).

The HCP has been rolled out in phased cycles (see Table below) to ensure that the model and resources are evaluated and fit for purpose. Further Phases will open on a cyclical basis and interested clubs will be invited to apply via the GAA’s Community and Health website.

Due to capacity Phase 3 will remain a controlled pilot with the aim to open up expressions of interest to all GAA clubs in Ireland in 2020 (Phase 4)

Phase 1– 2013 (Q1) – 2015 (Q3) 18 Clubs (16 completed) Covering 4 provinces

Phase 2– 2016 (Q1) – 2017 (Q3) 60 Clubs (58 completed) At least one club covering 32 counties

Phase 3– 2018 (Q1) – 2019 (Q3) 150 Clubs (at least 3 in each county)

Phase 4– 2020 (Q1 – 2021 (Q3) Aim: Re-opening of expressions of interest to all 1,600 GAA clubs – number of clubs selected will be based on capacity of Community & Health Department.

GAA – Get involved with the HCP

There is a seven step process undertaken to become an accredited Healthy Club:

  1. Appoint Healthy Club Officer and Team
  2. Receive Healthy Club Training
  3. Club Mapping
  4. Community Consultation
  5. Develop and Activate Action Plan
  6. Host Local Launch
  7. Report and Reflect

The 7 step process is based on best practice and has been refined following feedback from participating clubs in the pilot stages of the Healthy Club project (HCP). The process covers an 18-month period and based on clubs experience, recommends the ideal time points for each step. By following these steps a club will be best positioned to ensure the work they undertake is:

  • Recognised at a national level
  • Responding to identified need within the club/community
  • Supported by the Club, Community and appropriate partners
  • Sustainable and well-planned
  • Achieving real impact (can be measured-useful when seeking funding)
  • Positively impacting on club members and the community
  • Reflecting best practice

The consensus from pilot clubs is to focus on these “small steps that can achieve lasting impact”

Each step is described in more detail during Healthy Club Officer Training which is available in each county through the GAA County Health and Wellbeing Committee. To avail of this please contact the Chairperson of the Committee chair.hwc.county@gaa.ie – Insert your county name, for example chair.hwc.clare@gaa.ie to get further information on the training click HERE.

Upon receiving the training, the Healthy Club Officer will receive a Healthy Club Manual which they can use as a further support tool to guide them and the Healthy Club Team on fulfilling their role.

GAA 7 Steps to becoming a Healthy Club

Healthy Clubs – Case Studies

This section contains numerous Healthy Club case studies that have worked well.

Popular areas of interest include:

• healthy eating

• physical activity for non-playing members

• mental fitness and emotional wellbeing

• gambling, drug, smoking and alcohol education

• community development – engaging older members; inclusion and integration